STRIKE!

January 25, 2013 § Leave a comment

STRIKE! invitation (courtesy Limerick City Gallery of Art)

STRIKE! invitation (courtesy Limerick City Gallery of Art)

As Ireland turns further into its Decade of Commemorations, Limerick City Gallery of Art presents STRIKE!, an exhibition exploring industrial disputes and workers resistance including the occurrence of Limerick’s extraordinary SOVIET, with material from Limerick City Museum, exploring the strike protest that existed in Limerick and ‘excited world attention’ in April 1919.

STRIKE! presents the Battle of Orgreave (an injury to one is an injury to all) by Jeremy Deller, directed by Mike Figgis, co-commissioned by Artangel and Channel 4. In a series of Films curated by Anthony Haughey, a wide range of response to industrial unrest, across many countries from Ireland to Argentina

The list of Films on show include:

  1. STRIKE Sergei Eisenstein (94 minutes)

  2. Dole not Coal COMPRESS Media (135 minutes)

  3. Harlan County USA – Barbara Kopple (105 minutes)

  4. Salt of the Earth Herbert J. Biberman (94 minutes)

  5. The Take Avi Lewis & Naomi Klein (87 minutes)
  6. The Great Grunwick Strike Brent Trades Council (64 minutes)

  7. Stand Together Brent Trades Council (52 minutes)

  8. Look back at Grunwick Brent Trades Council (26 minutes)

  9. The Globalisation Tapes Vision Machine Project (70 minutes)
  10. The GAMA Strike (60 minutes)

  11. The Forgotten Space Allan Sekula (116 minutes)

The following films will be screened on dates to be confirmed, with guest speakers attending:

    1. Modern Times Charles Chaplin (87 minutes)

    2. 161 Days Declan O Connell (45 minutes)

The Head Quarters Project calls on members of the community to contribute to a collective unearthing of buried memory of Limerick’s Soviet.

These explorations begin LCGA’s year-long presentation of the notions of Labour and Work in today’s world, with exhibitions throughout the year, drawing from the centenary of Dublin’s 1913 Lockout. It is, at the very least poignant, that this exhibition opens as workers from HMV concluded a sit-in for their rights and entitlements as workers, with many others realising the instability and problematic nature of working in Ireland and Europe today.

STRIKE! opened on January 24th and continues until March 15th. Further information available here

‘COMMEMORATION IS ABOUT THE FUTURE’

January 8, 2013 § Leave a comment

Having entered the centenary year of the Dublin Lockout, the words belong to the curator of this project, Helen Carey (Director, Limerick City Gallery of Art), and formed part of Helen’s presentation as part of a panel discussion held last October at the Arts Office of the Dublin City Council, The LAB. In the context of the exhibition, Digging the Monto, facilitated by Thomas Kador, the panel critically addressed the question of how to commemorate the 1913 Dublin Lockout, the 1916 Rising and the Treaty?

Thematically, Helen addressed the role of memory, the relationship between power and the construction of history and with such awareness, what is the role of contemporary visual art practice to mark this pivotal moment in Irish labour history with critical significance for the globalised present and the possibilities for a re-imagined future. Now available online, the presentations begin with Helen and are followed by  Mary Muldowney (Oral Historian, Trinity College Dublin), Padraig Yeates (Lockout  Historian & Writer),Roisin Higgins (Historian, Boston College), Pat Cooke (School of Art History & Cultural Policy, University College Dublin) and is chaired by Charles Duggan (Dublin City Council).

When we are talking about commemoration, we are talking about power and not necessarily history (Helen Carey)

THE FUTURE STATE OF IRELAND

November 10, 2012 § Leave a comment

This forthcoming conference, part of a project of the same name, is taking place at Goldsmiths, University of London and will seek over the course of the two days:

to examine the repercussions of the crash for an island on the periphery of Europe from a cultural perspective. Examining cultural responses both pre and post economic meltdown, the conference will explore the possibilities of a new post-crisis Ireland: from the highly visible to the barely perceptible consequences of the crash and austerity, sources and limits of citizen resilience in crisis, the perceived value of cultural responses and active/passive citizenships. It will provide an opportunity for leading thinkers and practitioners across different disciplines to come together to discuss artists’ and citizens’ reactions and resilience in times of crisis and austerity.

A programme of visual and live art focused on crisis, resilience and endurance will intersect the conference schedule. 

Speakers include Fintan O’Toole, Professor Roy Foster, Troubling Ireland Think Tank (of which Helen Carey is a project participant) and Kennedy Browne amongst others. The key organisers are Dr. Derval Tubridy, Stephanie Feeney and Nicola Bunbury. The conference takes place on 17-18 November, 2012 and full details regarding speakers and booking can be found here.

Digging the Monto: An archaeology of tenement life and the 1913 Lockout

October 23, 2012 § Leave a comment

Occurring at The LAB, the Arts Office of Dublin City Council, an exhibition will open this Thursday, October 25th and continue until November 10th.

Monto (image courtesy The LAB)

 

‘Drawing on the results of recent archaeological excavations undertaken by a community archaeology group led by Dr Thomas Kador, the show will feature a variety of visual displays including old photographs from the area, artefacts,  and historical census records’

The exhibition is accompanied by a number of free talks, a walking tour and discussions focusing on Dublin tenement life, the 1913 Lockout, and the proposed commemorations for the forthcoming centenary. Included in this programme on the opening night is a panel discussion titled

From the Lockout to the Rising and the Treaty: (How) should we commemorate?

It is chaired by Charles Duggan (Dublin City Council) / Padraig Yeates (Lockout Historian) / Pat Cooke (University College Dublin) / Mary Muldowney (Trinity College Dublin) / Roisin Higgins (Boston College) and the curator of this project, Helen Carey (Limerick City Gallery)

The discussion begins at 6pm and further information can be found here.

Publicart.ie Interview with project curator, Helen Carey

January 9, 2012 § Leave a comment

Publicart.ie interviewed Helen Carey, curator and Director of the Limerick City Gallery of Art, about her project developing the centenary exhibition to commemorate the 1913/ 2013 Lockout.

THE MARKET a project by Mark Curran

January 9, 2012 § 9 Comments

In the continuing evolutionary aftermath of the global economic collapse of 2008/2009 and absence of sustained practice-led research engagement with the central locus of this catastrophic event, the ethnographically informed, multi-sited, transnational project, THE MARKET (2010-), builds upon the cycle of long-term research projects, beginning in the late 1990s, by practice-led researcher and educator, Mark Curran, and focuses on the functioning and condition of the global markets and the central role of financial capital.

THE MARKET (installation image) Belfast Exposed 2013

THE MARKET (installation image) Belfast Exposed 2013

The cycle of multi-media research projects, addressing the predatory context resulting from migrations and flows of global capital began with SOUTHERN CROSS (1999-2001)(Gallery of Photography/Cornerhouse 2002) which surveyed the spaces of development and finance of the so-called ‘Celtic Tiger’ Irish Republic. This was followed by  The Breathing Factory (2003-2006)(Edition Braus/Belfast Exposed/Gallery of Photography 2006) and subject of his practice-led PhD, sited in a multinational complex in Leixlip in the East of Ireland, the project addressed the role and representation of labour, global labour practices and fragile nature of globalised industrial space. Ausschnitte aus EDEN/Extracts from EDEN (2003-2009)(Arts Council of Ireland, 2011) focused upon a declining industrial and coalmining region in the former East Germany, an area which prophetically evidenced the massive impact regarding the unevenness of development inherent through the functioning of neoliberal globalisation. All projects are intended to demonstrate a continuing and sustained engagement addressing the predatory impact of global capital.

Critically, the ongoing project, THE MARKET, which began in 2010, seeks to access those sites, which all of the other project work to date has also been decisively defined, spaces where literally and metaphorically, futures are speculated upon – the global markets – and to explore, survey and excavate focusing upon their operating functioning and how this is reflected in for example, language, architectural understandings and centrally, the individuals who inhabit, dwell and labour within these global financial spheres. Conceptually pivotal and mindful of technological evolution with specific reference to the role and functioning of algorithms, has been a desire to both make visible an understanding of such sites and to explore the interconnectedness of such markets. Therefore, multi-sited access has been sought to survey various global locations, including sites in Dublin, London, Frankfurt, Addis Ababa and Mumbai. Extended stays and re-visits have been undertaken in each location to facilitate further research regarding the site, address access, establish contacts and develop relationships with individuals as key collaborators and informants of the project.

As demonstrated in Curran’s previous projects, the cross-disciplinary interventions have included an ethnographic understanding in the collaborative and multi-vocal application of media in the form of photography, audio-digital video, soundscape and the collation of verbal testimony. The intention for THE MARKET has been to afford process-led undertakings over the course of its construction, extending to site-specific interventions, web presence and forums around the project installations incorporating interested parties thereby facilitating the opening up of discursive spaces around the central thematic.

The anthropologist, Karen Ho’s central argument is that Wall Street investment bankers reshape corporate America in their own image, and through the construction of the market, result in the manufacture of crises while simultaneously, ‘assuring its rescue’ (2009: 323). In this, as she defines, ‘economy of appearances’, Ho outlines operating structures, the significance regarding ‘pedigree’, citizen complicity and the critical role of fear in this ‘culture of liquidity’ (ibid.)’ Ho, K. (2009) Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street New York: New York University.

In the financial markets, there is a natural predatory instinct that is hard to control (former trader and author, Micheal Lewis, BBC World Service, 9 May 2010)

The video shows a taped up plastic curtain inside the factory, one that seems to be installed for blocking the artist from viewing production equipment and process. Although we cannot see, there seems to be a working (breathing) machine inside the curtain as it, almost unnoticeably, inflates and deflates repetitiously. In fact, the video seems to summate what the audience experiences in the exhibition. The camera made its way inside the factory, but it cannot tell us what the employees actually do or what they produce. We are only allowed to hear the breathe of the factory. This is analogous to today’s globalised economy and financial markets. For many of us, it is almost unfathomable to understand how they operate. We are left outside of a curtain, inside of which a giant machine breathes intermittently. (from Spectators of the Same Story: Economy, Technology, Photography, Jung Joon Lee, Review of The Breathing Factory: A Project by Mark Curran, DePaul Art Museum (DPAM), Chicago January-March 2010, CAMERAta, Seoul, Korea, May 2010)

Keywords Global Capital, Ethnography, Photography, Speculation, Transnational, Vulnerable, Fieldwork, Precarity, Testimony, Cross-disciplinary, Labour, Witness, Reflexive, Installation, Montage, Multivocality, Access, Technology, Algorithms, Visual Art, Futures

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