The Economy of Appearances – Installation (Film)

March 25, 2016 § Leave a comment

‘In Mark Curran’s practice, projects unfold over time. (Since the late nineties) Curran has undertaken a cycle of long-term, ethnographically-informed multimedia research projects addressing the predatory context resulting from migrations and flows of global capital…in this major exhibition, The Economy of Appearances, Curran draws these projects together for the first time, expanding the enquiry with newly commissioned work completed in Amsterdam. Incorporating photographs, film, sound, artifactual material and testimony, themes include algorithmic machinery of financial markets, as innovator of this technology, absorption of crises as normalisation of deviance, and long range mapping and consequences of financial activity distanced from citizens and everyday life’ Helen Carey

from Installation at Limerick City Gallery of Art (Autumn 2015)

Filming Isabella Walsh
Editing Isabella Walsh & Mark Curran

Thanks to Arts Council Ireland, Noorderlicht Photography, NEPN (University of Sunderland), Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT), Belfast Exposed Photography Gallery, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Gallery of Photography & Culture Ireland

Full information here (e-flux).

Installation images here.

The Economy of Appearances @ LCGA (Installation)

October 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

1_LCGA_Curran

In this major exhibition, The Economy of Appearances, Curran draws these projects together for the first time, expanding the enquiry with newly commissioned work completed in Amsterdam. Incorporating photographs, film, sound, artifactual material and testimony, themes include algorithmic machinery of financial markets, as innovator of this technology, absorption of crises as normalisation of deviance, and long range mapping and consequences of financial activity distanced from citizens and everyday life.
2_LCGA_Curran 5_LCGA_Curran 6_LCGA_Curran

6A_LCGA_Curran

Curran filmed in the new financial district of Zuidas on the southern periphery of the Dutch capital – a global centre for algorithmic trading. Adapted from a text by former trader and now financial activist, Brett Scott, which examines High Frequency Trading (HFT) and how the input of human values, are excluded, the voiceover and title of the film are inspired by Scott’s essay, Algorithmic Surrealism. The film suggests the hegemony of HFT and the extinction of human reason or intelligence – human strengths that also include traits such as empathy and ethical behaviour – in Market decisions will both perpetuate and render more extreme the power relations of minority wealth in globalised capitalist systems

7_LCGA_Curran

Through the application of an algorithm identifying the words “market” and/or “markets” in public speeches by relevant national Ministers of Finance, the data is then transformed to create the installation soundscape. To date, algorithmic translations of Michael Noonan (Ireland), George Osborne (United Kingdom), Pierre Moscovici (France) and Jeroen Dijsselbloem (Netherlands & Eurozone Group President) have been included in exhibitions in those countries. Curran activates the popular graphic representation of such circumstance through a 3D visualisation/virtualisation of the algorithmically-generated soundscape—The Economy Of Appearances—to represent contemporary financial capital functioning through the conduit of the financialised nation state.

Financial Surrealism (WTC), Zuidas Financial District, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2015, (A4 double-sided colour print) (text on reverse)

Financial Surrealism (WTC)
Zuidas Financial District, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2015
(A4 double-sided colour print)
(text on reverse)

…in the case of the Netherlands, most of the Dutch shadow banking sector…is set-up by corporations for tax purposes, to attract external funding and to facilitate intragroup transactions…the focus of the shadow banking entities located in Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands is the euro area, or even global.

While the relative importance of the euro area shadow banking sector has risen significantly since 2007, it remains smaller than the regulated banking system. Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Ireland are the exception: the shadow banking sector assets in these three countries are substantially larger than those of the regulated banking system, accounting for almost two-thirds of the entire euro area shadow banking system. Credit through non-bank channels can have important advantages and contributes to the financing of the real economy, but can also become a source of systemic risk…

(source Banking Structures Report (2008-2013), European Central Bank, October 2014)

Shadow Banking

Many financial institutions that act like banks are not supervised like banks. The term, shadow bank was coined by U.S. economist Paul McCulley in 2007…because they are not subject to traditional bank regulation…they are in the shadows.

They are characterized by lack of disclosure and information about the value of their assets…opaque governance and ownership structures between banks and shadow banks; little regulatory or supervisory oversight…

Shadows can be frightening because they obscure the shapes and sizes of objects within them. The same is true for shadow banks. Estimating the size of the shadow banking system is particularly difficult because many of its entities do not report to government regulators. The shadow banking system appears to be largest in the United States, but nonbank credit intermediation is present in other countries—and growing. The shadow banking system’s share of total global financial intermediation was about 25 percent in 2009.

(source Finance & Development, International Monetary Fund, June 2013 Vol. 50 No.2)

9_LCGA_Curran

Portrait (Child) from series Stoneybatter (Dublin) August 1998

Text Helen Carey

Algorithm & Sound Composition: Ken Curran
3D Data Visualisation: Damien Byrne
Film Editor: Lidia Rossner
Film script adapted by Mark Curran from original essay by Brett Scott
Voice: Claudia Schäfer

Thanks to Arts Council Ireland, Noorderlicht Photography, NEPN (University of Sunderland), Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT), Belfast Exposed Photography Gallery, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Gallery of Photography & Culture Ireland

Mark Curran The Economy of Appearances
4 September–30 October 2015
Opening: Thursday, 3 September
Limerick City Gallery of Art
Carnegie Building
Pery Square
Limerick
Ireland
gallery.limerick.ie

Full information here.

The Economy of Appearances @ Limerick City Gallery of Art

September 3, 2015 § Leave a comment

LCGA e-vite The Economy of Apperances Mark Curran curated by Helen Carey

Opening Thursday, 3 September

‘In Mark Curran’s practice, projects unfold over time. (Since the late nineties) Curran has undertaken a cycle of long-term, ethnographically-informed multimedia research projects addressing the predatory context resulting from migrations and flows of global capital…in this major exhibition, The Economy of Appearances, he draws these projects together for the first time, while expanding the enquiry with newly commissioned work completed in Amsterdam. Incorporating photographs, film, sound, artifactual material and testimony, themes include algorithmic machinery of financial markets, innovator of this technology, absorption of crises as normalisation of deviance, and long range mapping and consequences of financial activity distanced from citizens and everyday life…’
Helen Carey

E-Flux announcement & full text here. Continuing until 30 October

Limerick City Gallery of Art
Carnegie Building
Pery Square
Limerick
Ireland

Thanks to Arts Council of Ireland, Noorderlicht (Netherlands), NEPN (University of Sunderland, UK), Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT), Belfast Exposed, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Gallery of Photography & Culture Ireland

Acknowledgments
Algorithm Design & Sound Composition Ken Curran, 3D Data Visualisation Damien Byrne, Editor Lidia Rossner, Voice Claudia Schäfer Script adapted from an original essay by Brett Scott

Image
Algorithmic Surrealism 2015 (digital still)
(Single channel HD digital video, colour, sound/voiceover)
Zuidas Global Financial District, Amsterdam, Netherlands

THE MARKET/ Centre Culturel Irlandais/ Paris

January 30, 2014 § Leave a comment

 
CCI Invitation (cover)

CCI Invitation (cover)


…what people don’t understand… is that what happens in the market is pivotal to their lives… not on the periphery, but slap, bang, in the middle…
(from telephone conversation with Trader (name withheld), Dealing Room, Investment Bank, London, February 2013)


Mark Curran’s challenging new project THE MARKET sets out to make visible – literally and metaphorically – the sphere where our futures are speculated upon. His multi-media installation includes photographs, films, transcripts of interviews and a soundscape that investigate the functioning of the global stock and commodity markets. From Dublin to London, Frankfurt and Addis Abeba, the artist concentrates on the experience of individuals working within a supremely complex system. 
In the installation at the Centre Culturel Irlandais, the relationship between the individual and the abstract algorithmic systems of the market is heightened through a sound piece designed by Ken Curran that permeates the gallery space, which is generated from algorithms identifying the words market or markets from public speeches given by the French Minister of Finance, Pierre Moscovici.

Opening of events will be made by 
Rory Montgomery, Irish Ambassador to France 
Nora Hickey M’Sichili, Director of Centre Culturel Irlandais
 
Centre Culturel Irlandais 
5, rue des Irlandais 

75005 – Paris 


January 30 – March 2
 
Opening Thursday, January 30 at 6.30pm

Opening times of the exhibitions:

2pm – 6pm Tuesday to Saturday

(Late opening Wednesday until 8pm)

12.30pm – 2.30pm Sunday


Full programme contextualising the exhibition on the opening weekend includes panel discussion with David McWilliams (Writer & Economist), Alfred M’Sichili (Philosopher & Political Economist), Helen Carey, Mark Uzan (Reinventing Bretton Woods Committee) and Mark Curran, an evening with the organisers of ‘Kilkenomics’.
 
In addition there will be a special screening on Saturday, February 1st at 5.00pm of the documentary, Skin in the Game, directed by Donald Taylor Black, (Filmmaker and Head of Department of Film & Media, IADT) addressing the response of artists in Ireland to the 2007 economic collapse.
 
Algorithms and soundscape design: Ken Curran.
The full programme is available here
 
This project was generously supported by the Arts Council of Ireland & the Arts Council of Northern Ireland.
It was presented in Ireland at Gallery of Photography, Belfast Exposed and Limerick City Gallery of Art as part of a nationwide artistic project in 2013, curated by Helen Carey (director of Limerick City Gallery of Art), to mark the centenary of the 1913 industrial conflict known as the Dublin Lockout.

The installation and events in Paris are supported by the Arts Council of Ireland and Culture Ireland.
 
Preview of show in Paris by Actual Colours May Vary can be found here.

Land │Labour │Capital

September 23, 2013 § Leave a comment

new_home

Future State, in partnership with Limerick City Gallery of Art (LCGA) and Goldsmiths, University of London, is an interdisciplinary and collaborative conference at LCGA on 26-28 September and is taking place during Labour and Lockout, an exhibition to mark the centenary of the 1913 Dublin Lockout, a key moment in Ireland’s industrial history when employers refused to recognize workers in an attempt to break worker solidarity and the trade union movement.

Land│Labour│Capital will reflect on the relevance of 1913 for the contemporary moment and seek, through dialogue, to foreground radical and alternative narratives for future history-making.

Invited speakers include Dr. Mark CurranDr Angela Dimitrakaki, Professor Nicholas Mirzoeff and Dr. Deirdre O’Mahony among a host of other academic and artist participants.

The full programme including screenings, events and presentations can be found here.

UPDATE (October 2013)
Founding member of Future State and central organiser, Stephanie Feeney, offers some rich reflection and insight on the conference events which can be read here.

LABOUR & LOCKOUT: ‘you take my life when you do take the means whereby I live’

August 2, 2013 § Leave a comment

Labour&Lockout_evite

Opening Thursday, August 8th at the Limerick City Gallery of Art, this group show curated by Helen Carey, employs the context of the centenary of the 1913 Dublin Lockout as a means to reflect and address its significance for the present. The show continues until October 1st.

Artists include Deirdre O’Mahony, Anthony Haughey, Deirdre Power, Darek Fortas, Jesse Jones, Sean Lynch, Seamus FarrellMegs Morley & Tom Flanagan and Mark Curran.

In addition, from the 26-28 September, the research collective, Future Stateis collaborating with Goldsmiths, University of London and Limerick City Gallery of Art to host Land Labour Capital, a three-day event of film screenings, artist talks, seminars and workshops related to the exhibition theme. Keynote speakers will include, Deirdre O’MahonyProfessor Nicholas MirzoeffDr Angela Dimitrakaki and Mark Curran. 

Full details can be found here.

MODERN TIMES Screening & Talk – Limerick City Gallery of Art (LCGA)

March 9, 2013 § Leave a comment

Unemployment is the vital question … Machinery should benefit mankind. It should not spell tragedy and throw it out of work.
(Charlie Chaplin) 1931.

Annex - Chaplin, Charlie (Modern Times)_01

still from Modern Times (1936) by Charlie Chaplin

As part of the programme of the current exhibition, STRIKE!at the Limerick City Gallery of Art, there will be a screening of MODERN TIMES (1936), written, scored and directed by Charlie Chaplinat 2.00Pm on Monday, March 11th, 2013. This will be followed by a discussion from Mark Curran with specific reference to the visual representation of the conditions of labour and the resonance of Chaplin’s undertaking for the present.

Further information regarding the exhibition and full details of this event, can be found here.

STRIKE!

January 25, 2013 § Leave a comment

STRIKE! invitation (courtesy Limerick City Gallery of Art)

STRIKE! invitation (courtesy Limerick City Gallery of Art)

As Ireland turns further into its Decade of Commemorations, Limerick City Gallery of Art presents STRIKE!, an exhibition exploring industrial disputes and workers resistance including the occurrence of Limerick’s extraordinary SOVIET, with material from Limerick City Museum, exploring the strike protest that existed in Limerick and ‘excited world attention’ in April 1919.

STRIKE! presents the Battle of Orgreave (an injury to one is an injury to all) by Jeremy Deller, directed by Mike Figgis, co-commissioned by Artangel and Channel 4. In a series of Films curated by Anthony Haughey, a wide range of response to industrial unrest, across many countries from Ireland to Argentina

The list of Films on show include:

  1. STRIKE Sergei Eisenstein (94 minutes)

  2. Dole not Coal COMPRESS Media (135 minutes)

  3. Harlan County USA – Barbara Kopple (105 minutes)

  4. Salt of the Earth Herbert J. Biberman (94 minutes)

  5. The Take Avi Lewis & Naomi Klein (87 minutes)
  6. The Great Grunwick Strike Brent Trades Council (64 minutes)

  7. Stand Together Brent Trades Council (52 minutes)

  8. Look back at Grunwick Brent Trades Council (26 minutes)

  9. The Globalisation Tapes Vision Machine Project (70 minutes)
  10. The GAMA Strike (60 minutes)

  11. The Forgotten Space Allan Sekula (116 minutes)

The following films will be screened on dates to be confirmed, with guest speakers attending:

    1. Modern Times Charles Chaplin (87 minutes)

    2. 161 Days Declan O Connell (45 minutes)

The Head Quarters Project calls on members of the community to contribute to a collective unearthing of buried memory of Limerick’s Soviet.

These explorations begin LCGA’s year-long presentation of the notions of Labour and Work in today’s world, with exhibitions throughout the year, drawing from the centenary of Dublin’s 1913 Lockout. It is, at the very least poignant, that this exhibition opens as workers from HMV concluded a sit-in for their rights and entitlements as workers, with many others realising the instability and problematic nature of working in Ireland and Europe today.

STRIKE! opened on January 24th and continues until March 15th. Further information available here

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